SKELTON - IN - CLEVELAND
IN HISTORY

THE MINERS' ARMS, BOOSBECK RD, SKELTON GREEN.


The Miners Arms about 1901.
Daniel Clissold tenant, Name can be seen on side of building.
The folk at the door would seem to be Daniel, his wife Mary and an unknown lad.

The discovery of a photograph of the Miners' Arms, Skelton Green with just Christian names on the back has revealed some of the interesting History of this public house on Skelton Green.

Thanks for this are due to the research of Owen Rooks, a native Skeltoner, now living in Sunderland.

1871.
The premises have not been found on the Census for this year and when they were built or first became a public house is not presently known.

1881.
BEERHOUSE KEEPER SELLER .

The census of this year shows that No 3 Boosbeck Rd, Skelton Green was occupied by John Breckon, age 36, born Fryup, N Yorks, who describes himself as a 'Beerhouse Keeper Seller'.
He is living there with his wife, Sarah, age 33, and a daughter Mary, age 8.

1891.
WIDOW LANDLADY.

The 'Inn Keeper' is Harriet Ord, age 48, born in Yorkshire. Living with her were her Mother, age 87, son John J, aged 15 and Granddaughter, Harriet Bunn, age 9, all born in Yorkshire.
She also has a Lodger, William Wiltshire, an Ironstone Miner, age 40.

1901.
THE CLISSOLDS.

The census of this year shows the pub being run by Daniel Isaac Clissold, 'Innkeeper', age 40, who had been born in Bath, Somerset.
He had married Mary Inman in 1886 and is living there with her and one daughter, Victoria A Clissold, just born in this year. Plus a Servant, Louisa Betts, age 22, born in Norwich, Norfolk.

Christian names are as they appear on the back of the photograph.
The date of the photograph is not presently known.
But there is no doubt that 'Uncle Ben' is Benjamin Seaman, who had married the widow of the previous tenant, Daniel I Clissold on December 1908.
The widow's name was Mary [nee Inman], who died in 1910 and Ben re-married to another Mary [nee Husband] in 1911.
So the reference to 'Edna his wife' is a mystery.
Ben had a brother called George and no doubt this is he.

5th March 1908.
EARLY DEATH OF DANIEL CLISSOLD.

Daniel died on this day, aged 47. He was buried in New Skelton Cemetery.

20th December 1908.
QUICK RE-MARRIAGE OF THE WIDOW.

There were possibly some eyebrows and suspicions raised at the speed with which Daniel's re-married, for there seems to have been little time for grieving.
Mary, married Benjamin Seaman, of New Skelton, just 9 months later at Skelton. Ben was 42 and she was 47.
The 1881 census shows Benjamin as a 16 year old working in the Ironstone Mines.
His Father, James Seaman, aged 67 at that time was still working as a General Labourer and his Mother, Ann aged 56.
They had six children, James, 26, George, 21, Robert, 19, and Benjamin. All Ironstone workers. And 2 daughters, Mary, 17 and Hannah, 12.
The family lived at 12 Groundhills, Skelton. All had been born in Norfolk. [The majority of people who came to this area for work in the Mines at this time were from East Anglia, where agricultural work was being replaced by machines.]

March-June 1910.
QUICK DEATH OF THE WIDOW.

Mary did not last long and died during this period.

Jan-March 1911.
QUICK RE-MARRIAGE.

Yet another quick marriage followed less than a year later.
Benjamin Seaman wasted no time in marrying Mary Husband of 21 Harker Street, Skelton Green.
She was just 21 and the daughter of John Husband, a Labourer at the Mines, aged 48, born Yorkshire, and Mary J Husband, aged 52, born Cornwall, who had the usual large family of that time.

5th January 1912.
Life was not easy for a pub Landlord in these times, as the following newspaper report and countless others on this website show -
TAKING UP ARMS AT THE MINERS ARMS.
A Skelton Green Miner, named Tom Brunskill, was charged with being drunk and disorderly at Skelton on the 28th December and refusing to quit the Miners' Arms Beerhouse on the same date.
Benjamin Seaman, the landlord, said that Brunskill came to his house on the day in question and as he was drunk he was refused more beer.
This incensed Brunskill, who began to use very foul language to Seaman's wife and servant.
He declined to leave the premises and the landlord was compelled to put him out.
This was done 4 times, causing the landlord to stand guard at the door.
Brunskill behaved "like a madman", it was claimed.
Brunskill said that the landlord struck him causing his head to bleed, but this was denied.
The Bench fined him ten "bob" [10 shillings] for each offence.


12th April 1918
SEAMAN FAMILY DEATH IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

100 men of Skelton were killed in the First World War and are remembered on the village Memorials.
Benjamin Seaman's nephew, the son of his brother James, was one of these. He was killed in action on this day.
He was 220435 Private George William Seaman, aged 24, of the 10th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment and formerly 3569 Yorkshire Regiment.
The family had moved to 43 Carney St, Boosbeck, N Yorks by this time and
the lad had worked as a Horsedriver and Miner prior to enlisting in the Yorkshire Regiment.
See the circumstances of his death and his Memorial - here.

1937. March/June. DEATH OF BENJAMIN SEAMAN.

1952. March/June. DEATH OF MARY SEAMAN. [Second wife].

If anyone can add more about the Miners' Arms or the people who ran it in these times or later, please email the address on the Introduction page.
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